Watch

Sethuraman “Panch” Panchanathan shares examples of ASU’s approach and global impact as a knowledge enterprise.

A team of ASU entrepreneurs has developed an innovative and inexpensive solution to the problem of infant jaundice in developing countries.

As public health workers fight to stop the spread of ebola, an ASU researcher approaches the problem from an unexpected angle and makes a major breakthrough.

What kind of world do we want to live in, and how do we create it? As a New American University, ASU is designed to empower discovery and innovation that has a profound impact on our community and our world. In this video, ASU scientists, scholars and entrepreneurs share the significance of research and innovation in our knowledge enterprise.

Researchers at the Center for Cognitive Ubiquitous Computing investigate people's individual needs, and then determine what design principles are most useful for addressing those needs.

Stephen Johnston, co-director of the Center for Innovations in Medicine, has developed a device that can determine your health status from a single drop of blood or saliva. By examining the action of B-Cells in a process known as immunosignaturing, the HealthTell device can diagnose a developing illness or disease before any symptoms appear. This could revolutionize diagnostics. 

The DNA nanopore, designed at ASU, is a single molecule technology that can read the entire genome of an individual for less than $1,000. Functioning inside a medical device, this same technology will one day be able to read the epigenetic code within the proteins of a patient's cell. This will revolutionize diagnostic medicine and create a truly personalized standard of treatment.

This year ASU celebrates the researchers and innovators who use light and light-based technologies to focus, reveal, highlight, communicate, illuminate, enlighten and inspire.

Dogs share our homes, our lives and our hearts. Unfortunately, they also share our vulnerability to dementia, through a disease similar to Alzheimer’s. At ASU’s Canine Science Collaboratory, dogs navigate a maze to help researchers understand memory in man’s best friend.

How do humans assign value and meaning? What is the role of religion in our lives? Do we owe anything to the natural environment? Many of life’s deepest questions can't be studied in a test tube or solved with an algorithm. They can only be explored through the humanities.

Chemicals we use every day often evade current water treatment processes, threatening the security of our water supply.

Take a quick tour of our timeline to see some of ASU’s biggest discoveries over the last 20 years, from a surprising new species on the deep ocean floor to a promising Ebola treatment grown in tobacco.

What if every soldier could run a four-minute mile? That's the goal behind 4MM, or 4 Minute Mile, a student project to create a wearable jetpack that enhances speed and agility.

ASU is leading a team of 50 researchers and practitioners from 15 different institutions to help make urban infrastructure more resilient to extreme weather events.

More than 100 agricultural crops in the U.S. rely on bees for pollination. But bees are dying off at more then twice the sustainable rate. A team of ASU students has developed an innovative alternative.