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Life sciences

Better living – and eating – through plants

ASU research shows how to make plants produce more food, even in drought or salty soil. But there are challenges to getting this work off—or into—the ground.

Making movies of molecular machines

The structures of some of the most scientifically important biomolecules have been impossible to determine—until now. ASU researchers helped pioneer a technique for observing these proteins in action.

Complexity: More than the sum of its parts

ASU’s interdisciplinary approach provides a perfect environment for exploring the complex systems underpinning life, society and advanced technology.

Phoenix: A living lab for sustainable cities

Cities have unique and complex ecosystems that affect people and nature profoundly. Using Phoenix as a model, ASU is helping us understand the long-term dynamics of urban environments.

ASU explores Antarctica

Researchers from astrophysics to sustainability share their experiences of doing research in Antarctica.

The breathing ocean

Susanne Neuer is a marine biologist at ASU who studies the ocean's role in mitigating the effects of climate change, and the microscopic organisms that make it possible for oceans to absorb excess atmospheric CO2.

Series: Carbon and climate change

ASU researchers are working on new approaches to addressing climate change related to the most abundant human-produced greenhouse gas--carbon dioxide.

Bee-free pollination

More than 100 agricultural crops in the U.S. rely on bees for pollination. But bees are dying off at more then twice the sustainable rate. A team of ASU students has developed an innovative alternative.

Nature by design

Ecologists don’t just work in the wilderness. Urban ecologists at ASU’s CAP LTER are helping us to understand how humans and nature interact in the city, and to maximize the benefits we get from our environment.

Human-nature relationship: “It’s complicated”

As humans impact the environment, the environment impacts us, in turn. ASU researcher Michael Barton studies this complex relationship.

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