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X-ray visionaries

Researchers at ASU's Biodesign Institute are pioneering the use of super-fast, super-bright X-rays to map out the structure of proteins. Their work is helping to replicate photosynthesis, develop better pain medications and more.

Mayo Clinic-ASU seed grant program funds new research projects

Novel research gains momentum, and additional funding, through the Mayo-ASU seed grant program.

Making movies of molecular machines

The structures of some of the most scientifically important biomolecules have been impossible to determine—until now. ASU researchers helped pioneer a technique for observing these proteins in action.

Locally tailored programs put peer pressure in its place

Culturally relevant interventions developed at ASU empower young people to evade the peer pressure that can lead to substance abuse.

The Big Idea: How can a box of light help treat infant jaundice?

A team of ASU entrepreneurs has developed an innovative and inexpensive solution to the problem of infant jaundice in developing countries.

Soap’s dirty secret

Antimicrobial consumer products are ineffective and pose a serious environmental hazard. Research from ASU is informing efforts to regulate those pervasive chemicals.

A flexible future for today’s technologies

From X-ray machines that can wrap around gas pipelines to computer displays embedded in soldiers’ uniforms—ASU is manufacturing devices that stretch the possibilities of electronic technologies.

The Big Idea: How can tobacco help treat ebola?

As public health workers fight to stop the spread of ebola, an ASU researcher approaches the problem from an unexpected angle and makes a major breakthrough.

Student venture advances jaundice treatment globally

Millions of babies fail to receive adequate treatment for jaundice each year, particularly in developing countries. ASU entrepreneurs teamed up to create a solution.

‘Pharming’ tobacco to beat Ebola

The Ebola virus has devastated communities for 40 years without a vaccine or cure. One promising new approach, pioneered at ASU, grows a treatment in plants.

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